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religiousmom:

for my final trick, i shall turn into a disappointment

(via encourage)

valenate:

“When I met Winona and we fell in love, it was absolutely like nothing before. We hung out the whole day… and night, and we’ve been hanging out ever since. I love her more than anything in the whole world.”
-Johnny Depp on is relationship with Winona Ryder

"I’d die for her. I love her so much. I don’t know what I would do without her. She’s going through a lot right now. I wish I could just kiss away the pain, make it go away, stop it, kill it! If she, you know, I don’t know what I would do. I’d kill myself. I love that girl. I love her. I love her almost more than I love myself." - Johnny Depp on Winona Ryder (1989).

“i can’t get him out of my head! it’s like i’m always seeing his image in my head. my life has changed for the better since i’m with johnny. he’s so amazing!” - winona ryder on johnny depp (1989)

“Crazy For You” by Madonna is like our song. It’s so clese to us. We have all these songs we cherish. When we first met, “Take My Breathe Away” by Berlin was on. That’s our first song. But “Crazy For You” describes our relationship. Maybe a possible wedding song, I hope. We’ll have to see what Johnny thinks. - Winona (April 1991)

"When I met Johnny, I was pure virgin. He changed that. He was my first everything. My first real kiss. My first real boyfriend. My first fiancé. The first guy I had sex with. So he’ll always be in my heart. Forever. Kind of funny that word." – Winona.

“The split in 1993 was during the filming of Ed Wood and there were days he would come crying, I felt so bad. I asked him why it happened but all he said was, ‘It wasn’t her fault, it was mine.’ And when he met Kate in January of 94, it wasn’t the same as Winona. I felt weird to be around him like he wasn’t acting like Johnny anymore. It’s almost like Winona took Johnny’s soul, Johnny’s love.” - Tim Burton

(via z0mbie-pirate)

(Source: theandsign, via z0mbie-pirate)

"

Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.

"

- PBS: Language as Prejudice - Myth #6: Women Talk Too Much (via misandry-mermaid)

(via samolikekelso)